The correct Russian giant

The correct Russian giant


Let's do a mental experiment. Imagine that the Russian Academy of Sciences creates a joint-stock company of a clearly commercial nature, and first of all this commercial structure begins to engage in the import and sale of computing equipment. Let's think, what comments would appear under such news? Most likely, such:

- “Scientists should be engaged in science, not commerce!”
- “Shame on the government, which makes scientists barge with imported electronics!”
- “Another drinking and sawing office! They will lease buildings and sell the land of institutions for development! ”
All listed? Probably not all, but the genre is guessed exactly. And now traditionally check patterns for strength. The fact is that such a company already exists, though not in Russia, but in China. Moreover, it is quite possible that you use its products every day. The Chinese Academy of Sciences Technology Company started with importing electronics, but that’s in the past. Today, this company is called Legend Holdings, and its most famous subsidiary is called Lenovo.Legend Holdings is the majority owner of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the largest minority shareholder is a Chinese scientists retirement fund, so every time you buy a Lenovo phone or computer, you contribute a little to paying pensions to Chinese retirees from the scientific community. In addition to computers and electronics, Legend Holdings is engaged in construction, insurance, venture investments, machine tools, agriculture, and even owns a small Hollywood film studio. By the way, since July of this year, a small package of shares of Legend Holdings has been trading on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, so those who wish can easily buy a small piece of this Chinese corporate giant.
This Chinese example well illustrates the thesis that the point is not in the form of ownership and not in the size of a company, but in the quality of its management. The state can be an effective owner of not only a specific rig, not only a particular company, but also a whole industrial and financial conglomerate. There are many such examples in China, and they work very successfully, and we still have an unconditional reflex in expert circles and the media: if a company is large, it needs to be broken into several pieces and urgently sold,so that an “effective private owner” manages an “efficient small business”.
The same irresponsible "experts" usually advocate for the accelerated development of small and medium businesses, waving statistics about the high proportion of small and medium businesses in the GDP of such countries as France or Germany. This is a typical case of an owl pulling on a globe, and on a cubic globe. It is only in the parallel universe of our liberals that the “European small business” consists of cozy Parisian cafes and glamorous London salons for the care of beards of fashionable hipsters. In the real world, a truly profitable small and medium business consists of subcontractors of large companies or directly depends on large companies. You can try to explain with a very simple example: if there is a large aircraft factory in the city and everything is fine, the cafe next to the checkpoint will flourish regardless of state policy, but if the plant goes bankrupt, then the cafe will not benefit from any tax holidays or subsidies. And so it turns out that the best support for small private businesses is the development of large state-owned businesses.
Modern competition in the global market is a struggle between giants and giants, and it is this form of business that is cultivated both in the West and in the East. For example, the "icons of world capitalism" - Warren Buffett and Richard Branson are the owners and leaders of conglomerates. There are certain difficulties in the creation of truly strong business structures in our country. It will make sense to talk about private conglomerates after the end of de-offshore. And today in Russia there is only one world-class conglomerate that can work as a locomotive for the economic, technological and social development of the country and which is not built on a resource or natural monopoly - this is Rostec State Corporation.
In this regard, the reaction of the leading media to the recently released Rostec for 2014 is interesting and indicative. The liberal media rushed to suck up the numbers of payments on export contracts of Rostec that were “stuck” in Western banks, which came under Western sanctions. Patriotic media emphasize (and rightly so) that, despite the sanctions and jumps in the exchange rate, the Russian industrial conglomerate was able to generate 33.9 billion rubles of net profit with revenues of 964.5 billion rubles.For the year of introduction of sanctions, sharp currency fluctuations and a significant complication of foreign trade activity, this is a really good financial result, but other accents are also needed. It is important not only that the state corporation (unlike many other state structures) works “plus”, but also that this company shows what state capitalism with a human face means.
In most corporate reports, the section on social responsibility is written, as they say, “with special cynicism,” in the sense that filling it out is just a tribute to fashion and “propriety.” PR people scratch the budget for the so-called "events", which then will look good in the report, and the benefits of these events are the tenth thing. In the case of Rostec, it is clear that the social orientation of the company is a completely tangible reality for more than 400 thousand of its employees. Any employee would like to get a job in a company that:
- subsidizes interest and down payment on employee mortgage loans;
- subsidizes the cost of renting housing employees;
- creates a full-cycle medical system for employees.
It is nice to see that the company does not eat up its income, but invests in itself (Rostec spent more than 100 billion rubles last year on business development) and into the country's future, for example, in those 32 perinatal centers that are being built with the support of Rostec. This is socially oriented state capitalism.
When you buy YotaPhone 2 or Lada West, you support not an anonymous, faceless, offshore corporate structure, but quite a Russian industrial conglomerate. In the future, its line of civilian products will definitely become larger, for example, at the expense of computers based on the Elbrus processor.
Now there is a difficult and very responsible process of import substitution, and, unfortunately, on many levels there is still an allergic reaction to attempts to create preferences for our producers. The media indignantly sizzles in response to supplying government procurements like the Central Bank, the Russian Post and the Central Election Commission 100,000 computers of their own production based on the Elbrus processor, which will dramatically reduce the cost of production and in the long term release Russian computers into the retail market at an affordable price.The big misunderstanding causes the same Rostec to receive a monopoly on the supply of drugs for HIV. Obviously, without state support and without healthy protectionism, we will not be able to achieve sovereignty in key areas such as electronics and pharmacology. I want to believe that healthy protectionism will win pseudoliberal dogmas.
Rostec is sometimes called the “Russian chaebol”, thus trying to hurt a state-owned company that has done a lot to restore many Russian enterprises from ashes. Comparison with Korean conglomerates ("chaebols") like Samsung does not hold water. Rostec is a state-owned company, not a private entity under the control of a single family. Rostec is not seen in corruption scandals, on the contrary, judging by the report for the last year in the framework of operations to combat corruption, damage of 2 billion rubles was prevented. There is only one similarity that unites Rostec, South Korean chaebols (Samsung, LG), Japanese keiretsu (Mitsubishi, Sumitomo) and American conglomerates (General Electric, Berkshire Hathaway) - the desire to occupy a leading position in the domestic and global market.One can only rejoice that a correct, strong Russian conglomerate has emerged and is successfully developing in Russia. The future of our country depends on the success of such companies.

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  • The correct Russian giant

    The correct Russian giant

    The correct Russian giant

    The correct Russian giant

    The correct Russian giant

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